Unbiased Bad Service?

Well, that’s true. Bad service is sometimes just bad service and doesn’t necessarily mean a personal affront, but some of the the language in the Waiterrant post indicates preconception: The Waiter calls the old man “Cranky-looking,” and suggests he may be suffering from dementia. He might be. It happens. But to make surmises without getting a full medical history feeds in people, especially the elderly, disabled or others for whom dining out can be a challenge, the exact kind of fears Bauer is trying to lay to rest.

On Waiterrant today, the Waiter gives a slightly gushing report of an elderly man dining with his family and sort of freaking out about the price. While the overall tone of the post is kindly and indulgent, it’s just that kind of indulgence, and the conspiratorial winking between the Waiter and the man’s younger family members, that leads to the sentiment in Michael Bauer’s post yesterday.

For the record, the Waiterrant post is, overall, quite eloquent and touching, but a good example unfortunately timed.

I’m not saying it never happens, but I think in most cases it’s simply insensitive, uncaring service rather than blatant discrimination. It also gets to one of the core issues of running a restaurant: hospitality. If diners, for whatever reason, feel unwelcome, they end up searching for an explanation.

Well, that’s true. Bad service is sometimes just bad service and doesn’t necessarily mean a personal affront, but some of the the language in the Waiterrant post indicates preconception: The Waiter calls the old man “Cranky-looking,” and suggests he may be suffering from dementia. He might be. It happens. But to make surmises without getting a full medical history feeds in people, especially the elderly, disabled or others for whom dining out can be a challenge, the exact kind of fears Bauer is trying to lay to rest.

On Waiterrant today, the Waiter gives a slightly gushing report of an elderly man dining with his family and sort of freaking out about the price. While the overall tone of the post is kindly and indulgent, it’s just that kind of indulgence, and the conspiratorial winking between the Waiter and the man’s younger family members, that leads to the sentiment in Michael Bauer’s post yesterday.

For the record, the Waiterrant post is, overall, quite eloquent and touching, but a good example unfortunately timed.

Investments
“We accept Visa, Mastercard, but no old women” [Between Meals]

Unbiased Bad Service?