The World’s Wildest Delicacies

If you’ve ever watched Andrew Zimmern’s show Bizarre Foods on the Travel Channel, this is the story for you. The Times of London sent reporter Matt Rudd on the trail of the world’s wildest delicacies. Check out what it’s like to eat the exotic ortolan:


Considered by the French as the ultimate gastronomic experience, and by the rest of the planet as the ultimate cruelty, ortolan-munching was banned in 1999. It’s not hard to see why: putting a napkin over your head and scoffing a petite and endangered songbird, bones, beak and all, could be construed as unnecessarily nasty. Not long before the ban, François Mitterrand didn’t set a good example, requesting ortolan to be served to him and 30 guests at a final banquet, eight days before he succumbed to cancer. This month, the French government agreed to enforce the original ban after campaigners revealed that an estimated 30,000 birds were still being poached each year in Aquitaine. Tastes like crunchy hazelnuts with a brandy aftertaste – not surprising, as the unfortunate birds meet their death in a glass of armagnac. I can think of worse ways to go.

Yeah, that’s kind of disgusting.

The world’s wildest delicacies [Times of London]

The World’s Wildest Delicacies