NoPa’s Rise Leads To The Rise of NoPa

The article also points out the success of Tsunami and Little Star Pizza, which is a big star in its own right (sorry, too easy).

Last week’s article in the New York Times Travel section about the super duper coolness of the NoPa district (“Colonizing an Urban Frontier”) was no exception. We’ve already expounded upon the newfound trendiness of the neighborhood that’s known as “North of the Panhandle,” but the Times takes it a step further by (probably correctly) pointing out that the ‘hood’s rise was sparked by the tremendous success of Nopa:

But what really put the neighborhood — and its name — on the map is the restaurant Nopa (560 Divisadero Street; 415-864-8643; www.nopasf.com).The restaurant, which opened last year, has created quite stir, not only for its organic kitchen (a grass-fed beef hamburger is $12), but for making a point of serving filtered tap water as a greener alternative to bottled. The large space is housed in a former bank and has concrete floors, a communal table and an open kitchen that stays open until 1 a.m., a welcome anomaly in a city that goes to bed early.

The article also points out the success of Tsunami and Little Star Pizza, which is a big star in its own right (sorry, too easy).

Last week’s article in the New York Times Travel section about the super duper coolness of the NoPa district (“Colonizing an Urban Frontier”) was no exception. We’ve already expounded upon the newfound trendiness of the neighborhood that’s known as “North of the Panhandle,” but the Times takes it a step further by (probably correctly) pointing out that the ‘hood’s rise was sparked by the tremendous success of Nopa:

Colonizing an Urban Frontier [NY Times]
Nopa [MenuPages]
Nopa [Official Site]
Earlier: Bar Crudo Spinoff/Sequel Coming To NoPa [MenuBlog]

[Image courtesy: Geocities]

NoPa’s Rise Leads To The Rise of NoPa