Food Science Watch: Edible Films

Interesting. The New York Times reports on the efforts of food scientists to create edible antimicrobal films for foods from natural substances. For instance, thin films woven from a thyme derivative could line bags of spinach to kill E. coli. Alternately, as the Times puts it:


Strawberries could be dipped in a soup made from egg proteins and shrimp shells. The resulting film — invisible, edible and, ideally, flavorless — would fight mold, kill pathogens and keep the fruit ripe longer.

Which seems a bit puzzling to us. Many advances made by food scientists to create safer, longer lasting foods have led to a loss of taste. Compare your average supermarket tomato, bred for a long shelf life and in wax-covered skin, to a delicious farmer’s market specimen. Or take milk fresh from a dairy and compare it to the supermarket version. It doesn’t add up. In addition, what about the many vegetarian, kosher and halal eaters who might be concerned about breaking their dietary codes? Hmm.

Interesting. The New York Times reports on the efforts of food scientists to create edible antimicrobal films for foods from natural substances. For instance, thin films woven from a thyme derivative could line bags of spinach to kill E. coli. Alternately, as the Times puts it:

[Image via New York Times]

Food Science Watch: Edible Films