On Nigerian Cuisine


Most adventurous–or cultured–eaters are probably familiar with Ethiopian and Eritrean cuisine, but odds are that most Bay Area dwellers have little to no experience with Nigerian food. Wikipedia, for all intents and purposes, seems to be in the same boat as the rest of us. (“Nigerian cuisine, like West African cuisine in general, is known for its richness and variety.” Gee.. thanks.)

In any case, Nigerian food, unlike its Eastern African counterparts, remains a rare commodity in the restaurant world, but Berkeley can now boast to have a rare representative. Luckily, Patricia Unterman’s review of the just-opened Lagosia sheds a lot of light–for us at least–on the wonders and idiosyncracies of Nigerian cuisine:

[A dining companion] professionally pulled off a wad of gluey iyan (pounded white yam), rolled it into a ball, flattened it with her fingers and used it as a scoop for efo, a spinach and goat stew. I dropped my knife and fork and did the same thing.This single change in the delivery system expanded the flavor, texture and tactile pleasure of eating the saucy, gently spicy dishes at Lagosia, a handsome new West African restaurant in Berkeley.


Most adventurous–or cultured–eaters are probably familiar with Ethiopian and Eritrean cuisine, but odds are that most Bay Area dwellers have little to no experience with Nigerian food. Wikipedia, for all intents and purposes, seems to be in the same boat as the rest of us. (“Nigerian cuisine, like West African cuisine in general, is known for its richness and variety.” Gee.. thanks.)

In any case, Nigerian food, unlike its Eastern African counterparts, remains a rare commodity in the restaurant world, but Berkeley can now boast to have a rare representative. Luckily, Patricia Unterman’s review of the just-opened Lagosia sheds a lot of light–for us at least–on the wonders and idiosyncracies of Nigerian cuisine:

Lagosia a nice intro to Nigerian cuisine [Examiner]
Nigerian Cuisine [Wikipedia]
Lagosia [Official Site]

On Nigerian Cuisine