Digesting The Reviews: ‘Modern Vintage’ … Not So Oxymoronic After All

This week in the Chronicle Food Section, Michael Bauer returns after his one-week sabbatical, though he continues last week’s San Francisco boycott and heads up to Sonoma and the General’s Daughter. The buzz surrounding the General’s Daughter prompted Bauer to make the trip(s) to wine country; after all, just about anyone would be intrigued by biodynamic gardens and progressive Californian-Southern fusion cuisine that the official website describes as “new America simmers with a distinct Southern drawl.” And simmer it does. Bauer finds no faults with the food, but the service has some kinks to be worked out:

One of the most difficult aspects of running a restaurant in more rural areas is finding professional servers. When we arrived, we waited about five minutes before being acknowledged, and then we were sent to the bar for 10 minutes so the staff could clean one of the three tables that was empty but unattended.

This week in the Chronicle Food Section, Michael Bauer returns after his one-week sabbatical, though he continues last week’s San Francisco boycott and heads up to Sonoma and the General’s Daughter. The buzz surrounding the General’s Daughter prompted Bauer to make the trip(s) to wine country; after all, just about anyone would be intrigued by biodynamic gardens and progressive Californian-Southern fusion cuisine that the official website describes as “new America simmers with a distinct Southern drawl.” And simmer it does. Bauer finds no faults with the food, but the service has some kinks to be worked out:

Elsewhere in the review-niverse, Ms. Tablehopper gives us a first look at the newest San Francisco restaurant to be housed in former army barracks, Presidio Social Club. The retro All-American ambiance gets stellar marks (“no Johnny Rockets experience here”), but the real find is the surprisingly affordable menu:

The all-American menu looks like it was transported from San Francisco circa 1941, and the prices, while not offering abalone for $2 and Celery Victor for 40¢, are downright affordable. I couldn’t resist the Cannibal Sandwich ($9), slices of carpaccio-esque beef topped with sweet Maui onion, capers, chives, and hard boiled egg—like a deconstructed steak tartare draped on marbled rye bread. Delish.

As an added bonus, there’s ample parking, which needless to say is a rarity in the city. All in all, the Tablehopper seems to give PSC two vintage thumbs up. [Tablehopper]

King of the Chowhounds Robert Lauriston reprises his quasi-regular gig at SF Weekly and examines the new Hawthorne Lane, better known as TWO. In what he describes as a “half-makeover,” TWO puts a modern feel on traditional, once-tired dishes; all in all, it’s good enough to spend his own money on. Good enough for us. But how’s the happy hour? [SF Weekly]

Rounding out the week in reviews: Carol Ness at Berkeley’s Angeline’s Lousiana Kitchen, Amanda Gold’s Bargain Bite checks out Roadside Barbecue, Paul Reidinger at V2, SFBG’s Cheap Eats goes to Walnut Creek for carne asada at Taqueria Mexican Grill and Bar Bites discovers Frisson’s affordable side.

[Photo courtesy: Flickr]

Digesting The Reviews: ‘Modern Vintage’ … Not So Oxymoronic After All