Displaying all articles tagged:

Recipe

  1. Olmsted’s Greg Baxtrom Shares His Famous Rangoon Recipe “It’s got cheese, bacon, and Brussels sprouts, and it’s fried. They’re going to love it.”
  2. bittman's kitchen
    A Rustic Zucchini Dish to Remind You of the Italian Childhood You Wish You HadMark Bittman’s simple, comforting recipe for zucchini and potatoes inspired by Sicily.
  3. In Season
    In Season: Nate Smith’s Roasted-Parsnip-and-Farro SaladBecause the cold helps convert their starch into sugar, a later harvest can result in an unusually sweet taproot.
  4. In Season
    In Season: The Kubbeh Project’s Pomelo-Juice CocktailIts mild, sweet juice makes a nifty seasonal substitute for grapefruit in this popular Israeli drink.
  5. In Season
    In Season: Jonathan Benno’s Pasta e FagioliMade with heirloom beans from California’s boutique beanery Rancho Gordo, which are firmer and more flavorful than average.
  6. In Season
    In Season: Rita Sodi’s Red Cabbage SaladYou can find good cabbage any time of the year, but winter is the brassica’s finest hour.
  7. In Season
    In Season: Couscous Tabbouleh With Parsley Root and Preserved LemonHugue Dufour has discovered that parsley root makes a first-rate foundation for this clever, winterized tabbouleh.
  8. In Season
    In Season: Hospoda’s Fried Egg Bread With Apple-Horseradish RelishIts super-pungent, sinus-thumping heat cuts the richness of winter’s meaty stews and braises.
  9. In Season
    In Season: Pecorino di FossaThis rustic formaggio is available now at Il Buco Alimentari & Vineria as well as at DiPalo Fine Foods.
  10. In Season
    In Season: Eduard Frauneder and Wolfgang Ban’s Pumpkin-Seed-Oil SpreadThe Seäsonal and Edi & the Wolf chefs combine pumpkin seeds with farmer’s cheese and spread across toasted rye or pumpernickel.
  11. Holiday Drinking
    The Complete Guide to Thanksgiving DrinkingOn the fourth Thursday of November, the turkey isn’t all that needs lubricating.
  12. In Season
    In Season: Paula Wolfert’s Caramelized QuincesYou can’t really eat this ancient fruit without cooking it, and cooking it well.
  13. In Season
    In Season: Seamus Mullen’s Crispy Fried Jerusalem ArtichokesHe likes to serve fried sunchokes as an alternative to fried potatoes.
  14. In Season
    In Season: the Breslin’s Boiled PeanutsYes, peanuts, in their raw or “green” state, have arrived at Greenmarket.
  15. In Season
    In Season: Saltie Chef Caroline Fidanza’s Cauliflower, Leek, andCauliflower comes into its own in the fall, when the Greenmarket overflows with orange, purple, and snowy-white varieties.
  16. In Season
    In Season: Calliope’s Rainbow Chard-and-Sorrel GratinIts ruffly leaves and sturdy stems count as two vegetables in one, and both can be used to great effect in rich gratins.
  17. In Season
    In Season: Roasted Eggplant With Fried Onion and Chopped LemonTry them in this killer recipe adapted from London veggie gurus Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s new cookbook, Jerusalem.
  18. In Season
    In Season: Sean Rembold’s Grilled Romano BeansTry quickly searing the beans in a cast-iron grill pan.
  19. In Season
    How to Make La Vara’s Gin-TonicAdding a super-size twist of lemon results in a thirst-quencher that may not only help prevent malaria but also scurvy.
  20. Home Cooking
    How to Make (or Where to Buy) an In-N-Out KnockoffBut do you use Dijon or yellow mustard?
  21. The Other Critics
    Bruni Sees Aldea As ‘Something of a Deal’; Freeman and SuttonPlus: Steve Cuozzo on the rebirth of Benoit and Robert Sietsema on Watty & Meg, in our weekly roundup of restaurant reviews.
  22. In the Magazine
    Platt on La Fonda del Sol; the City’s Best Bánh MìAlso in this week’s magazine: a recipe for matzo brei and three new openings.
  23. In the Magazine
    Girl Drink Drunks on the Rise; Eat Out of a Wood-Burning Oven in Vinegar HillAlso in this week’s magazine: Kefi returns, make a ginger-spice cake, and stuff your stocking with bacon brittle.
  24. Videofeed
    In Season: Broccoli and CheetosChef Craig Koketsu prepares the popular Park Avenue Autumn side dish.
  25. Click and Save
    Cook Like Your Favorite Chefs With Our New Recipe Database! The hardworking listings department at nymag.com has just added a stellar new feature: recipes! Our extensive database includes dishes drawn from New York’s finest restaurants. Get Laurent Tourondel’s instructions for chestnut-stuffed guinea hens; serve Tom Colicchio’s bruschetta of clam ragout; and assemble your own tartlets, just like they do at Gramercy Tavern. Search by ingredient, cuisine, type of dish, and more. Now there’s no excuse to eat out. nymag.com’s Recipe Finder
  26. Click and Save
    Rock-Star Recipes!You may recall that restaurant-launching chef Sam Mason stars in an Internet show called Dinner With the Band, where he teaches tricks of the trade to participating musicians. Intrigued by this concept, we wondered what other rockers eat. How handy are they in the kitchen — or in the parking lot, as the case may be — without the help of a professional? Kara Zuaro, editor of the Brooklyn Record, has the answers in her new book, I Like Food, Food Tastes Good: In the Kitchen With Your Favorite Bands, a collection of recipes she gathered from musicians at festivals, bars, and friends’ homes. There’s wild-boar ragù from the Violet Femmes, semi-raw everyday pasta from Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, buttermilk pie from Okkervil River, and much, much more. After the jump, Grub Street provides a taste of a few New York favorites.
  27. In the Magazine
    Fork-Crushed Potatoes: More Than Meets the UtensilIf there’s one rule about the weekly In Season recipe in the magazine’s Strategist section that we try to adhere to, it’s to keep things simple. This is due not only to limited space considerations, but also to the fact that we are of the let-the-ingredient-speak-for-itself school of cooking. Put another way, we’re lazy and hate cleaning up after ourselves. Still, this week’s recipe for fork-crushed Purple Majesty potatoes, courtesy of Gramercy Tavern’s Michael Anthony, was so exceptionally simple (yet undeniably delicious), it had people around the office talking. “This really couldn’t be much easier, could it?” said one admitted foodie, with a haughty note of reproof in her voice. Another cranky copy editor was more direct: “Even a small and not very gifted child can crush potatoes with a fork,” he said.
  28. The Underground Gourmet
    Josh DeChellis on How to Cook With Your Christmas Tree Everyone knows a good cook is a frugal cook, and no one takes this culinary code more seriously than Josh DeChellis, the skateboard-riding boy-wonder chef behind Sumile (recently tweaked and rechristened Sumile Sushi). In the spirit of the post-holiday season, DeChellis has come up with an idea that is not only environmentally responsible but also would make Euell Gibbons’s eyes goggle and his mouth water. “I was helping my parents take down the Christmas tree and the perfume was amazing,” DeChellis says. “So I took a few branches off and roasted a piece of grilled beef over the needles in an aluminum-foil pouch and I loved it!” DeChellis was kind enough to pass along a similar pine-scented recipe, below, so that Grub Street readers can recycle any trees or wreaths they have lying around the house instead of just dragging them outside to the curb. DeChellis also has a suggestion for stale gingerbread cookies: “Grind them up and crust scallops with it. Serve with a sauce of brown butter, gingerbread powder, and milk blended in a blender with Brussels sprout leaves on the side.” Delish! — Rob Patronite & Robin Raisfeld