Displaying all articles tagged:

Colors

  1. Celebrity Settings
    Jon Hamm Eats Gluten-Free; Gigi Hadid Tries UplandThis week’s Celebrity Settings.
  2. Reopenings
    Colors Comes Back to Life As a Gluten-Free, Living-Wage-Paying RestaurantThe cooperative East Village restaurant is serving “upscale comfort food.”
  3. NewsFeed
    Colors Back From the Dead, But Are Workers Happy Now?Colors is on the rebound, but what happened to that pesky lawsuit?
  4. Mediavore
    Colors Workers Rebel; Whole Foods Getting Into Craft BeerThe workers of Colors, originally envisioned as a co-op for orphaned Windows on the World employees, have sued the restaurant and the advocacy group that runs it, claiming that in fact none of them actually own any part of it. [NYP] Related: Marxist Meals Served at Co-op Eateries Whole Foods will be opening up a craft-beer bar with tap brews sold in carryout growlers — in September. [NYS] Animal activism has come of age, which is good news for calves, old hogs, and other unlucky beings that might otherwise be facing unspeakable fates. [NYT]
  5. Mediavore
    Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the Restaurant BusinessDid you know that Daniel has closed-circuit cameras watching every plate? That’s one of ten dark secrets of the restaurant business [SmartMoney] How good can a pizza delivered to New York from Oregon be? Pretty damn good, apparently. [Serious Eats] Balthazar’s not all that — and not just because it’s busy, either. [Diner’s Journal/NYT]
  6. Mediavore
    John’s Is Back, If Not Better Than Ever; Colors in the RedDon’t worry about Lonesome Dove’s Tim Love. He’s doing fine back in Texas. [Fort Worth Star-Telegram] John’s reopens, none the worse for wear after their brief run-in with the Health Department. [amNY] Colors, the cooperative founded by former Windows on the World workers, continues to struggle with the economic realities of opening and running a Manhattan restaurant. [NYT]
  7. Back of the House
    Marxist Meals Served at Co-op EateriesRestaurants run by workers seem like a great idea. Rather than having to bow and scrape before the Man, the employees of places like René Pujol and Colors, discussed recently in the New York Resident, more or less get to decide their own destinies. But they raise an age-old question (which most people haven’t pondered since college): Is the worker’s paradise really a practical idea?