Just Peachy: City Kids Now Hooked on Juice Cleanses

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Preeettty colors!
Preeettty colors! Photo: Clover

It’s basic economics: If kids juice-cleanse, health-food companies will supply and market juice cleanses for kids. Given their über-popularity, some may have thought this was inevitable, but couldn’t they have given us like a two-year head start to move out of the country? The Post says it’s too late and happening right now, however, and points to Dherbs.com, a California company that reports a 50 percent sales bump in its liquid-extract diet, intended for "toxic cleansing of kids, toddlers, and infants" (a downright steal at $99 for four bottles). And here’s Rawpothecary’s founder, who says why not just let adult raw drinks "replace children’s meals." Why not?

Preeettty colors!
Preeettty colors! Photo: Clover

The thing is, medical professionals are wary of all this cold-pressed exuberance. "The [kids are] quoting Dr. Oz to me," says one who, echoing most parenting advice, warns that excessive "cleansing" among the preteen set could spiral into eating disorders. The human heart "needs a certain number of calories" to beat, he says, after all.

Thankfully, some parents have complaints of their own. "I get upset — they’re expensive," says one parent of a first-grader with an $80-a-day habit.

Debate Rages Over Children on Juice Cleanses [New York Post]