Blais, Bloomingdale’s Prepare to Haggle Over Naming Rights

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After reading our Flip opening report last month, one commenter wondered, How long before Richard Blais asks for a name change? The former Top Chef contestant opened Flip Burger Boutique in Atlanta in December, and is eyeing a New York location. The concepts arent complete copycats Blais does his mad-scientist shtick with items like a shrimp Po' Boyger, and Bloomies spot is more build-your-own burger. But still, there are those similar names. We have applied for a trademark and they have not, Blais says. Our attorneys are looking into this.

Trademarks cover the immediate geographical area, except where fame is involved, says Ethan Horwitz, an intellectual-property partner at King & Spaulding LLP. If youre a local diner and you draw your customers from a one-mile radius, your trademark rights would be in that one mile, he explains. If youre known nationwide, you have a longer reach. The key question with trademarks is: If I see what the defendant is doing, would I somehow associate that with the plaintiff? According to Horwitz, if the Bloomingdales location opened before Blais filed for the trademark, Flip could keep its name. But if the Bloomies Flip opened after Blaiss Flip, the former would have to find a new name if Blais decided to open a store in New York.

Bloomingdales, which has not applied for a trademark, seemed unconcerned. Bloomingdales has been working on our Flip restaurant concept at 59th Street for more than a year. At the time that we initiated the project we did a name search and Richard Blaiss Flip Burger Boutique did not appear. We do not believe that there is any confusion with our Flip restaurant at Bloomingdales and the Flip Burger Boutique in Atlanta. If Blais does come to New York, expect a court battle to ensue. In the meantime, be grateful there are so many burger restaurants in New York right now that this is even an issue.