Critics Like Chop Suey Despite Themselves; One Star for Ilili

Frank Bruni awards one star to Ilili, establishing the restaurants critical reception as generally admiring but far from ardent. Bruni uses it as an occasion to discourse on the current trend of highlighting previously low-rent genres, but he seems to have liked all the food and not found the prices or noise too distracting. [NYT]

Steve Cuozzo wanted to hate Chop Suey, he really did. The name was dumb, and he was skeptical of consulting chef Zak Pelaccio, whose rsum of short-lived eatery associations is as long as his list of bona fide accomplishments is short. But he loved the food and its bold, explosive flavors. [NYP]

Ryan Sutton also plays the better than it has any right to be card with Chop Suey, declaring the place as jolting, gorgeous, frightening and reluctantly praising its Korean-themed food. [Bloomberg]

Bun, so much in the news lately, bowled Paul Adams over with its klutziness and inefficiency, the faltering gait of a newborn in his elegant phrase. Adams isnt a reviewer who dwells overly on service, so it must have been pretty bad. The food was good, though, and Michael Huynh was there on all his visits. [NYS]

Community Food and Juice may have all the allure of a neighborhood food bank, but Julia Moskin was totally taken with the place and considers it a near ideal neighborhood restaurant, thanks to its cheapness, good cooking, and welcoming feel. [NYT]

Robert Sietsema hates Peters Since 1969 so much that he spends nearly all of the review of the Williamsburg comfort-food spot concentrating on its former identity as a butcher shop with kielbasas that resembled giant curving phalluses. Ew. [VV]

Belcourt got a star, but just barely, from Moira Hodgson, whose food at the East Village wannabistro sounded largely inedible. They do have free wireless, though. [NYO]

Short summary of a very short Omido review: superb sushi and bad luxe dishes. [NYer]