Nature Bursts From the Pages of This Week’s Issue

Platt versus Psilakis, round two at Anthos.Photo: RJ Mickelson/Veras for New York Magazine


In this week’s issue, as befits spring, nature is bursting out of our food coverage. Snails and sea urchins take supporting roles in Adam Platt’s review of the highly rarefied Anthos; Gael Greene flutters into a restaurant called Tree; Rob and Robin talk tomatoes, spring almonds, and even more snails; and, in the spirit of growth, our food editors lay out two Short Lists of places where you can introduce young, growing gourmands to their future lifetime pursuit. Plus, four new restaurant bloom in the April sunshine, all in New York this week.

• Adam Platt visits Anthos, the most ambitious effort yet from a chef our critic has praised highly in the past. Will Psilakis’s attempt to bring Greece to France and Italy’s level pass muster with the big man?

• Gael Greene steps away from the major openings she’s been hitting and writes up a hidden treasure in the East Village: Tree.

• Rob and Robin consider the lowly snail, so primitive and yet so delicious, as it appears at Varietal, Craft, and DB Bistro Moderne, among other places.

• Tomatoes and corn come under the Robs’ view this week too, even though they’re not technically in season yet.

• Speaking of In Season, this week features a recipe for chili-salted green almonds by Brad Farmerie of Public.

• Four new restaurants open up, highlighted by the French Colonial cookery of FR.OG and the modernist tapas of Suba.

• David Bouley is opening a health-food restaurant next winter with celebrity nutritionist Oz Garcia.

• And finally, in honor of Bring Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, selections for where to take the little ones for their first power lunches.

Greek Revival
Tree
The Slowest Food
Eating Out-of-Seasonally
In Season: Green Almonds

Openings: FR.OG, Suba, Móle, and Paradou Marché.
UWS Opening for Bouley Lite
Power Lunch, Jr. Division
Power Lunch, Jr. Division, Part II [NYM]